AP Blog

By Jason Wissmiller, 09/28/2020
Following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, most insurers who had been offering coverage for War Risk exposures (which typically includes terrorism) quickly canceled those endorsements, per the coverage cancellation terms noted on the endorsements. The market for terrorism related coverage dried up almost...
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By Brian Lindahl, 09/24/2020
As senior living providers prepare for approaching renewal periods, we wanted to provide an update on our view of the changing marketplace. This will aid you and your team in determining your risk tolerance appetite and preparing your budgets for potential increased costs and decreased coverage. Unfortunately,...
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By Jim Stevenson, 09/23/2020
Does employment status really matter? The Internal Revenue Service says “yes” but the Service Contract Act says “no” when the Department of Labor enforces The Act. The Internal Revenue Service says employee status is important because it determines if the federal service contractor must...
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By Gina Ekstam, 09/22/2020
Proactive loss control is an effective approach to helping agribusinesses reduce risk, improve product quality, increase production, and boost employee morale and retention. Loss control requires top-down commitment, from management to safety directors to employees. To be successful, there needs to be a culture...
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By John Tankersley, 09/21/2020
When it comes to insuring your manufactured / mobile home, the rules are different than a standard homeowner’s policy. Most people think when it comes to insuring one’s home that it’s all pretty much the same – call your local agent, give your address and some basic information about the...
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By Nathanael Alexander, Esq., 09/17/2020
Updating a previous article, as of Friday, September 11, 2020 the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has indeed decided to move forward with issuing revised regulations under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) after a New York federal district court struck down several of the previous provisions of...
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By David Stein, 09/16/2020
The current economic climate is forcing producers and service contractors to take a hard look at insurance costs. Usually, the first (and easiest) step is to engage their broker to market the insurance program with alternate carriers. Competition will either drive down costs or validate the current placement....
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By Brian Lindahl, 09/15/2020
As an insurance and risk management partner to hundreds of assisted living communities across the country, we would like to extend an extra special “Thank You” to our assisted living clients for providing essential care and services to those in need. In appreciation of all that you and your team...
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By Rocky Roemer, 09/14/2020
Commercial automobile insurance as a segment of the insurance industry has been consistently unprofitable for around a decade. It’s a triple-whammy: Increasing frequency - due in part to distracted driving Higher loss costs (driven up by increased prices and complexity of the vehicles themselves) ...
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By Nathanael Alexander, Esq., 09/10/2020
As annual open enrollment time swiftly approaches, we wanted to take some time to note some of the COBRA considerations to be aware in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly as it pertains to changing carriers/vendors during this turbulent time. The federal government issued guidance regarding COBRA...
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Combative Residents: Just a Part of the Job?
07/27/2020

Growing rates of healthcare workers are experiencing physical and psychological injury as a result of workplace violence related to resident care. A staggering 95% of healthcare workers have reported exposure to aggression.  However, research has found that workplace violence is underreported, signifying that actual rates may be much higher and cause for concern.

In order to decrease violent and sometimes, combative outbursts of residents that can lead to injury, healthcare workers must understand the underlying triggers that precede the aggressive behavior. There are three main types of triggers:

  • Physical triggers include a physical inability to accurately describe or verbalize the needs and wants of a resident including pain, hunger, thirst, need for use of bathroom, or positioning needs. The healthcare worker may also provide the trigger through body language, touch, tone of voice, type of clothing/perfume worn, or mannerisms.
  • Emotional triggers may include a resident feeling depressed, overstimulated, or experiencing sensory changes.
  • Environmental triggers can include noxious stimuli from the environment surrounding the resident including noise from a television, other residents, busy nurses’ stations, or maintenance work nearby. Secondly, excessive clutter, large unfamiliar equipment, close proximity to objects or people or other changes in the resident’s regular habits and routines can all trigger violent outbursts.

Being aware of the triggers that can precede a violent outburst and knowing how to avoid these triggers can be instrumental in preventing injury to healthcare workers. Collaborating with the entire healthcare team and providing a specific resident-centered approach can decrease outbursts and keep healthcare workers, as well as the residents they care for, safe. 

The AssuredPartners Senior Living team has developed a resource to help senior living communities understand the triggers and different interventions that can be utilized.  For a copy of this resource, please contact our team.

Reference: Brown, B. & Kain, E. (2019). A Role for Occupational Therapy Practitioners in Mitigating Episodes of Workplace Violence in Health Care. American Occupational Therapy Association SIS Quarterly Practice Connections. 4, 31-33.